21 July 2021 In General Health
Alcohol consumption may be associated with the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but potential sex-related differences in this association have not been explored. Thus, we utilized 87,118 participants in the Kailuan Study, a prospective cohort initiated in 2006 to study the risk factors of cardiovascular disease in a Chinese population. We included those that did not have RA at baseline (2006), and performed cox proportional hazard modeling to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of RA according to the levels of alcohol consumption (never or past, light or moderate (1 serving/day for women, >2 servings/day for men), adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and smoking. Diagnoses of RA were confirmed via medical record review by rheumatologists. From 2006 to 2018, we identified 87 incident RA cases. After adjusting for potential confounders, the HR of RA was 1.26 (95% CI: 0.62, 2.56) for participants with light or moderate alcohol consumption and 1.98 (95% CI: 0.93, 4.22) for participants with heavy alcohol consumption) versus non-drinkers. The HR of each 10 g increase in alcohol consumption was 1.11 (95% CI: 0.98, 1.26) (p-trend = 0.09). A significant association between alcohol consumption and RA risk was observed in women, but not in men (p for interaction = 0.06). Among women, each 10 g increase in alcohol consumption was significantly associated with a high risk of RA (HR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.29). In contrast, each 10 g increase in alcohol consumption was not significantly associated with the risk of RA in men (HR: 1.10; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.25). Excluding past drinkers generated similar results. In this prospective Chinese cohort, increasing alcohol consumption was associated with an elevated risk of RA among women, but not in men. These findings highlight the importance of incorporating analysis of sex differences into future studies of alcohol consumption and RA risk.
26 May 2021 In Liver Disease
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Increasingly populations are both overweight/obese and consume alcohol. The risk of liver disease from the combination of these factors is unclear. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to address this important gap in evidence. Protocol registered with PROSPERO(CRD42016046508). METHODS: We performed electronic searches of Ovid Medline, Embase Classic + Embase, until 17th June 2020 for cohort studies of adults without pre-existing liver disease. Primary outcome was morbidity/mortality from chronic liver disease. Exposures were alcohol consumption categorised as within or above UK recommended limits (14 units/112 g per week) and BMI categorised as normal, overweight or obese. Non-drinkers were excluded. A Poisson regression log-linear model was used to test for statistical interaction between alcohol and BMI and to conduct a one-stage meta-analysis. RESULTS: Searches identified 3129 studies-16 were eligible. Of these, nine cohorts (1,121,514 participants) had data available and were included in the analysis. The Poisson model showed no significant statistical interaction between alcohol consumption and BMI on the risk of chronic liver disease. Compared to normal weight participants drinking alcohol within UK recommended limits, relative risk of chronic liver disease in overweight participants drinking above limits was 3.32 (95% CI 2.88 to 3.83) and relative risk in obese participants drinking above limits was 5.39 (95% CI 4.62 to 6.29). CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis demonstrated a significantly increased risk of chronic liver disease in participants who were both overweight/obese and consumed alcohol above UK recommended limits. This evidence should inform advice given to patients and risk stratification by healthcare professionals.
26 May 2021 In General Health
BACKGROUND: Alcohol harms are rising globally, and alcohol policies, where they exist, are weak or under-developed. Limited progress has been made since the formulation of the World Health Organisation (WHO) Global Strategy in 2010. WHO is seeking to accelerate progress in implementing international efforts to reduce the harmful use of alcohol. The threat to global health posed by tobacco is well understood by policy communities and populations globally; by contrast alcohol is much less so, despite available evidence. THE COMPETITION FOR EPISTEMIC AUTHORITY: Global alcohol corporations have sought to become trusted sources of advice for policy makers and consumers, while continuing to grow their markets. Evidence-informed public health messaging faces formidable competition from transnational corporations as the worlds of corporate and political communications, social and mainstream media become increasingly linked, presenting new opportunities for corporate actors to shape global health governance. Alcohol messaging that uses means of persuasion tied to industry agendas does not tell a clear story about commercial determinants of health, and does not contribute to health improvement. On the contrary, the basic tenets of an evidence-informed population-based approach are denied and the policy measures supported by high quality evidence are being opposed, because they are inimical to commercial interests. A David and Goliath metaphor for this state of affairs, which seems to fit at first glance, may unwittingly reinforce the status quo. CONCLUSION: Public opinion on alcohol and policy issues varies across time and place and can be influenced by dedicated public health interventions. Alcohol marketing dominates people's thinking about alcohol because we currently allow this to happen. Greater ambition is needed in developing countermarketing and other interventions to promote evidence-informed ideas with the public. Alcohol policies need to be further developed, and implemented more widely, in order to arrest the growing burden of alcohol harms across the world.
26 May 2021 In General Health
OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have reported inconsistent results on the relationship between alcohol intake and the risk of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to illustrate the potential role of alcohol intake on the progression of SLE. METHODS: An electronic search of the PubMed, EmBase, and the Cochrane library databases was conducted from their inception up to March 2020. Observational studies that investigated the role of alcohol intake on the risk of SLE were eligible for inclusion in this study. The pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated as an effect estimate using the random-effects model. RESULTS: Seven case-control studies (n = 3, 251) and three cohort studies (n = 322, 479) were selected for the final meta-analysis. Mild (OR: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.53-1.38; p = 0.515) or heavy (OR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.37-1.09; p = 0.102) alcohol intake were not associated with the risk of SLE, while moderate alcohol intake could protect against the risk of SLE (OR: 0.71; 95% CI: 0.55-0.93; p = 0.012). Sensitivity analysis suggested that heavy alcohol intake was associated with a reduced risk of SLE (OR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.32-0.67; p
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