05 December 2018 In General Health

Evidence on the relationship between alcohol consumption and body mass index (BMI) is mixed, particularly for young adults. This study explored the relationship between energy obtained from alcoholic beverages and BMI using data for 18(-)25 year-olds (n = 7691) from pooled cross-sections of the 2008(-)2014 Health Survey for England and the Scottish Health Survey. Energy obtained from alcoholic beverages (excluding mixers) on the heaviest drinking day in the past week was expressed as percentage of total recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of energy (% RDA Energy). Linear regressions were estimated of BMI on alcohol intake categories controlling for intake frequency, physical activity, longstanding illness and other covariates, with separate analyses for men and women, and by beverage type. Significant associations with BMI were observed with the 'Very High' category of alcohol intake (>75% RDA Energy) for men (p < 0.001, 1.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.98, 2.49) and with the "High" (>50% to 75% RDA Energy) (p < 0.001, 1.67, 95% CI 0.26, 2.58) and above category for women, when compared with the Low (>0(-)25% RDA Energy) category. Young adults drinking the highest levels of alcohol on a single occasion were more likely to be obese than those with the lowest intake. Interventions to address internationally rising youth obesity rates should also consider reducing alcohol consumption by increasing alcohol prices, and reducing availability and marketing exposure.

05 December 2018 In Cancer
To investigate the association of alcohol intake with colorectal cancer risk by race/ethnicity as well as sex, lifestyle-related factors, alcoholic beverage type, and anatomical subsite, we analyzed data from 190,698 African Americans, Native Hawaiians, Japanese Americans, Latinos and whites in the Multiethnic Cohort Study, with 4,923 incident cases during a 16.7-year follow-up period (1993-2013). In multivariate Cox regression models, the hazard ratio (HR) was 1.16 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01, 1.34) for 15.029.9 g/day of alcohol and 1.28 (95% CI: 1.12, 1.45) for >/=30.0 g/day in men, and 1.06 (95% CI: 0.85, 1.32) and 1.15 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.43), respectively, in women, compared with nondrinkers (P for heterogeneity by sex = 0.74). An increased risk was apparent in Native Hawaiians, Japanese Americans, Latinos and whites, and in individuals with body mass index
29 October 2018 In Cardiovascular System

Background: To assess sex-specific associations between risk-based alcohol drinking levels and the 10-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk scores and cardiovascular (CV) risk factors.

Methods: Data from 9,995 Koreans (4,249 men, 5,746 women), aged 40 to 79 years who did not have CVD and participated in the 2011 to 2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, were used to assess risk-based alcohol drinking levels in the past year (no drinking, drinking at low risk, and drinking at risk) categorized by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, components of the 10-year CVD risk scores using the Adult Treatment Panel III risk score and the 10-year hard atherosclerotic CVD risk score, CV risk factors, and confounding factors (age, smoking status, body mass index, educational attainment, income level, and physical activity).

Results: Drinking levels had positive associations with blood pressure and levels of glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and inverse associations with levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and non-HDL-C and ratio of total cholesterol (TC) to HDL-C in men, while higher drinking levels were associated with higher HDL-C levels and lower ratio of TC to HDL-C in women after adjusting for confounding factors (p for trend < 0.001). With respect to the 10-year CVD risk scores, higher drinking levels were associated with lower scores in both sexes (p for trend < 0.001).

Conclusions: Risk-based drinking levels were more likely to have dose-dependent associations with CV risk factors in men than in women and had inverse relationships with 10-year CVD risk in both men and women.

27 September 2018 In Liver Disease

PURPOSE: To study the association between coffee and alcoholic beverage consumption and alcoholic liver disease mortality.

METHODS: In total, 219,279 men and women aged 30-67 years attended cardiovascular screening in Norway from 1994 to 2003. Linkage to the Cause of Death Registry identified 93 deaths from alcoholic liver disease. Coffee consumption was categorized into four levels: 0, 1-4, 5-8, and greater than or equal to 9 cups/d and alcohol consumption as 0, greater than 0 to less than 1.0, 1.0 to less than 2.0, and greater than or equal to 2.0 units/d, for beer, wine, liquor, and total alcohol consumption.

RESULTS: The hazard ratios per one category of consumption were 2.06 (95% confidence interval 1.62-2.61), 0.68 (0.46-1.00), and 2.54 (1.92-3.36) for beer, wine, and liquor, respectively. Stratification at 5 cups/d (the mean) revealed a stronger association between alcohol consumption and alcoholic liver disease at less than 5 versus 5 or more cups/d. With less than 5 cups/d, 0 alcohol units/d as reference, the hazard ratio reached to 25.5 (9.2-70.5) for greater than or equal to 2 units/d, whereas with greater than or equal to 5 cups/d, it reached 5.8 (1.9-17.9) for greater than or equal to 2 units/d. A test for interaction was significant (P = .01).

CONCLUSIONS: Coffee and wine consumption were inversely associated with alcoholic liver disease death. Total alcohol consumption was adversely associated with alcoholic liver disease mortality and the strength of the association varied with the level of coffee consumption.

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