06 May 2014 In Cancer

 

 

 

The role of alcoholic beverages in bladder carcinogenesis is still unclear, with conflicting evidence from different studies. We investigated the relationship between alcohol consumption and bladder cancer, and the potential interaction between alcohol consumption and other exposures. In a population-based case-control study conducted in Los Angeles County, 1,586 pairs of cases and their matched neighborhood controls were interviewed. Data were analyzed to determine whether bladder cancer risk differs by alcohol consumption, and whether different alcoholic beverages have different effects. The risk of bladder cancer decreased with increasing frequency (p for trend = 0.003) and duration of alcohol consumption (p for trend = 0.017). Subjects who drank more than 4 drinks per day had a 32% lower (odds ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-0.90) risk of bladder cancer than those who never drank any alcoholic beverage. Beer (p for trend = 0.002) and wine (p for trend = 0.054) consumption were associated with reduced risk of bladder cancer, while hard liquor was not. The reduction in risk was mostly seen among shorter-term smokers who urinated frequently. Alcohol consumption was strongly associated with a reduced risk of bladder cancer. The effect was modified by the type of alcoholic beverage, cigarette smoking and frequency of urination.

 

 

 

06 May 2014 In Cancer

Evidence for the human carcinogenic effects of alcohol consumption on the risk of cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx has been considered sufficient in the International Agency for Research on Cancer Monograph 44 on alcohol and cancer in 1988. We evaluated human carcinogenic evidence related to the risk of oral and pharyngeal cancers based on cohort and case-control studies published from 1988 to 2009. A large body of evidence from epidemiological studies of different designs and conducted in different populations has consistently supported the fact that alcohol consumption is strongly associated with an increase in the risk of oral and pharyngeal cancers. The relative risks are 3.2-9.2 for more than 60 g/day (or more than four drinks/day) when adjusted for tobacco smoking and other potential confounders. A strong dose-response effect on the intensity of alcohol use is reported in most of the studies. However, no apparent association is observed for the duration of alcohol use. Compared with current alcoholics, a decreased risk of approximately 10 to 15 years is associated with alcohol cessation. Similar associations have been observed among nonsmokers in over 20 studies. In general, the dominant type of alcohol consumption in each population is associated with the greatest increase in risk. A large number of studies on joint exposure to alcohol and tobacco consumption show a greater than multiplicative synergistic effect.

14 November 2012 In Drinking & Driving

AIMS: It is generally accepted, but not yet documented that the risk of future alcoholism increases with the amount of alcohol consumed. The objective of this study was to investigate this association using the Copenhagen City Heart Study.

METHODS: Quantity and frequency of alcohol intake was measured in 19 698 men and women randomly drawn from the Copenhagen Population Register in 1976-78. The study population was linked to three different registers in order to detect alcoholism, and average follow-up time was 25 years.

RESULTS: After adjustment for all putative confounders, the risk of alcoholism for women increased significantly at 1-7 drinks per week with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.02 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16, 3.53) compared to never/almost never drinking; the HR for drinking monthly was 1.75 (95% CI: 1.08, 2.85). The risk for men did not increase significantly before 22-41 drinks per week (HR = 3.81, 95 % CI: 2.18, 6.68) or if they had a daily alcohol intake (HR = 3.55, 95 % CI: 2.11, 5.99). Smoking was independently associated with the risk of alcoholism for both men and women.

CONCLUSION: The risk of developing alcoholism increased significantly by very low intakes of alcohol in women, while the risk is only increased significantly in men consuming more than 21 drinks per week.

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