28 April 2022 In Dementia

Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are the two most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases, both without prevention or cure. The Mediterranean diet (MeDi) may be neuroprotective by modulating gut microbiota. We aimed to assess the effects of adherence to MeDi on the gut microbiota in relation to AD or PD risk. A search from inception to November 2020 was conducted in PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Web of Science, Global Health, Biological Abstracts, and Grey Literature Report databases.

Two searches were conducted: 1) (MeDi or Microbiota) and (PD or AD) and 2) MeDi and microbiota. Inclusion criteria for papers were specified prior to review. Of 4672 studies identified, 64 were eligible for inclusion. These studies were divided into five groups: MeDi and AD risk (n = 4), MeDi and PD risk (n = 2), MeDi and microbial composition or metabolomics (n = 21), AD and microbial composition or metabolomics (n = 7), and PD and microbial composition or metabolomics (n = 30).

Adherence to the MeDi was associated with a lower risk of AD and PD development. Eight genera and two species of bacteria had an inverse relationship with MeDi and AD, and one family, eight genera and three species of bacteria had an inverse relationship with MeDi and PD. More studies are needed to investigate if MeDi, gut microbiota, and neurodegeneration are causally related.

22 March 2022 In Dementia

Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are the two most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases, both without prevention or cure. The Mediterranean diet (MeDi) may be neuroprotective by modulating gut microbiota. We aimed to assess the effects of adherence to MeDi on the gut microbiota in relation to AD or PD risk. A search from inception to November 2020 was conducted in PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Web of Science, Global Health, Biological Abstracts, and Grey Literature Report databases.

Two searches were conducted: 1) (MeDi or Microbiota) and (PD or AD) and 2) MeDi and microbiota. Inclusion criteria for papers were specified prior to review. Of 4672 studies identified, 64 were eligible for inclusion. These studies were divided into five groups: MeDi and AD risk (n = 4), MeDi and PD risk (n = 2), MeDi and microbial composition or metabolomics (n = 21), AD and microbial composition or metabolomics (n = 7), and PD and microbial composition or metabolomics (n = 30).

Adherence to the MeDi was associated with a lower risk of AD and PD development. Eight genera and two species of bacteria had an inverse relationship with MeDi and AD, and one family, eight genera and three species of bacteria had an inverse relationship with MeDi and PD. More studies are needed to investigate if MeDi, gut microbiota, and neurodegeneration are causally related.

17 November 2021 In General Health

BACKGROUND: The association between Parkinson's disease (PD) risk and alcohol intake is a controversial topic.

OBJECTIVES: To systematically assess the association between PD risk and alcohol intake.

METHODS: PubMed and Embase databases were searched for eligible studies with prospective design on PD risk and alcohol intake. A meta-analysis with a random-effects model and dose-response analysis was performed. Relative risk ratios (RRs) with 95% CIs were calculated.

RESULTS: Eleven prospective studies were included. Overall, a higher intake of alcohol was inversely associated with PD risk (RR: 0.81, 95% CI: 0.70-0.95, I (2) = 73.7%). Significant differences existed between the specific types of alcoholic beverages and geographic area. Specifically, a significant association existed for beer (RR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.65-0.94, I (2) = 0.0%) and studies conducted in Asia (RR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.55-0.80, I (2) = 37.3%). Dose-response analysis indicated a nonlinear relationship between PD risk and alcohol exposure. No evidence for publication bias was detected.

CONCLUSIONS: In summary, our meta-analysis suggests that alcohol consumption was associated with a decreased risk of PD, with a nearly U-shaped association. Future studies are warranted to clarify the question of a specific type of alcoholic beverage-dependent association, geographic area effect, and possible threshold effects regarding both the adverse and beneficial effects of alcohol.

27 March 2020 In General Health

OBJECTIVE: We assessed the influence of sex on the effects of smoking and alcohol consumption on the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD).

METHODS: This population-based cohort study examined data of 6,795,816 Koreans aged >/=40 years from the Korean National Health Insurance Service database who completed a national program for general health check-up at 2009. For a maximum 9 years' observation period, incident PD was tracked, and hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using the Cox proportional hazard models, adjusted for potential confounding factors for each sex group. We tested interactions on the addictive scale by estimating the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI).

RESULTS: 3,400,538 men and 3,395,278 women generated 24,365,694 and 24,754,154 person-years, respectively. A total of 13,223 men (0.39%) and 14,818 women (0.44%) developed PD during follow-up. Current smoking and alcohol independently reduced the risk of PD in both sexes. Current male smokers tended to have a lower risk of PD than current female smokers at equal smoking intensity (P < 0.0001 for interaction) and duration (P < 0.0001 for interaction). In contrast, at equal alcohol intakes, PD risk tended to be lower in female drinkers than in male drinkers (P < 0.0001 for interaction). A superadditive interaction between smoking and alcohol was found in current male smokers (RERI, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.34; P = 0.015) and female ex-smokers (RERI, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.09 to 0.76; P = 0.014).

CONCLUSION: Our data suggest sex-related differences in individual and joint impacts of smoking and alcohol intake on the risk of PD.

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