23 February 2022 In Cancer

BACKGROUND: Heavy alcohol use is associated with increased risk of alcohol-related health consequences. Alcohol consumption has increased in females in the last fifteen years and females are more likely to experience exacerbated health risks due to drinking. Our group identified that females with AUD were more likely to report respiratory conditions or cancers compared to their male counterparts. This analysis sought to further examine relationships between sex and alcohol use on medical conditions by using the new 2020 U.S. Dietary Guidelines risk drinking levels.

METHODS: Data from the U.S. National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC-III; n = 36,309) was used to evaluate associations between sex (female vs. male) and alcohol risk drinking levels (abstainer, binge, heavy, extreme binge vs. moderate drinking) on past year self-reported doctor-confirmed medical conditions).

RESULTS: Females were 1.5 to 2 times more likely to have pain, respiratory, or other medical conditions in the past year (odds ratio [OR]=1.46–2.11) vs. males. Significant interactions demonstrated that heavy drinking females or extreme binge drinking females were 2 to 3 times more likely to have cancers or other conditions (OR=1.95–2.69) vs. males at the same risk drinking level. Female abstainers were more likely than male abstainers to have other medical conditions (OR=1.77).

CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with our previous findings, results identify that higher risk drinking levels are associated with the presence of past year self-reported doctor-confirmed medical conditions spanning organ systems, particularly in females. Treatment for high-risk drinking should be considered in the clinical care of individuals with significant medical conditions.

23 November 2020 In Drinking Patterns

The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between drinking patterns and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the Korean general population and to validate the estimation of the association of alcohol use on HRQoL when former drinkers are separated from never drinkers and low-risk drinkers depending on gender. Data were collected from 23,055 adults (over 19 years old) who completed the Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (2010-2013).

Multivariate logistic and linear regression analyses were performed to investigate the association between drinking patterns and HRQoL. When former drinkers were separated from never drinkers and low-risk drinkers to control for misclassification bias, there were gender differences in the associations between alcohol use and HRQoL. Although the estimation of the association of alcohol use was not valid in men, the estimation of association was valid in women, as low-risk women drinkers showed better HRQoL than nondrinkers.

Therefore, when conducting research related to alcohol and health, analyses should correct for the various confounding variables and minimize the misclassification bias of drinking patterns. It is also necessary to consider gender characteristics when intervening to improve HRQoL related to drinking.

23 November 2020 In Cardiovascular System

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The alcohol-hypertension relation has been well documented, but whether women have protective effect or race and type of beverage consumed affect the association remain unclear. To quantify the relation between total or beverage-specific alcohol consumption and incident hypertension by considering the effect of sex and race.

METHODS AND RESULTS: Articles were identified in PubMed and Embase databases with no restriction on publication date. Pooled relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by random effects models. Restricted cubic splines were used to model the dose-response association. This study involved 22 articles (31 studies) and included 414,477 participants. The hypertension risk was different among liquor, wine, and beer at 5.1-10 g/d of ethanol consumption (P-across subgroups = 0.002). The hypertension risk differed between men (RR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.20) and women (RR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.89, 1.06) at 10 g/d (P-across subgroups = 0.005). We found a linear alcohol-hypertension association among white (P-linearity = 0.017), black people (P-linearity = 0.035), and Asians (P-linearity<0.001). With 10 g/d increment of consumption, the RRs for hypertension were 1.06 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.08), 1.14 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.28), and 1.06 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.10) for Asians, black, and white people, respectively.

CONCLUSION: Sex modifies the alcohol-hypertension association at low level of alcohol consumption and we did not find evidence of a protective effect of alcohol consumption among women. Black people may have higher hypertension risk than Asians and white people at the same ethanol consumption.

25 August 2020 In Cardiovascular System
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The alcohol-hypertension relation has been well documented, but whether women have protective effect or race and type of beverage consumed affect the association remain unclear. To quantify the relation between total or beverage-specific alcohol consumption and incident hypertension by considering the effect of sex and race. METHODS AND RESULTS: Articles were identified in PubMed and Embase databases with no restriction on publication date. Pooled relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by random effects models. Restricted cubic splines were used to model the dose-response association. This study involved 22 articles (31 studies) and included 414,477 participants. The hypertension risk was different among liquor, wine, and beer at 5.1-10 g/d of ethanol consumption (P-across subgroups = 0.002). The hypertension risk differed between men (RR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.20) and women (RR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.89, 1.06) at 10 g/d (P-across subgroups = 0.005). We found a linear alcohol-hypertension association among white (P-linearity = 0.017), black people (P-linearity = 0.035), and Asians (P-linearity
Page 1 of 81

Disclaimer

The authors have taken reasonable care in ensuring the accuracy of the information herein at the time of publication and are not responsible for any errors or omissions. Read more on our disclaimer and Privacy Policy.