21 April 2021 In General Health

There is conflicting evidence for the association between alcohol consumption and common joint conditions such as Osteoarthritis (OA), which affects millions of people. We sought to determine the true association between alcohol intake and OA. We conducted a PRISMA systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies that reported associations between alcohol consumption and OA.

Pooled estimates of association were represented through odds ratios (ORs). Publication bias was assessed with Funnel and Galbraith plots, and risk of bias was assessed with the Newcastle Ottawa Scale. We included 29 studies and 25,192 subjects with OA and reported an OR between any alcohol consumption and OA of 0.79 (0.68-0.93), suggesting a protective effect. OR of weekly or more frequent use was 0.79 (0.65-0.97). When grouped by covariates, alcohol consumption was negatively associated with radiographic (0.83, 0.70-0.98), hand (0.80, 0.66-0.95) and knee OA (0.85, 0.72-0.99), North American ethnicity and female gender.

Subgroup analysis of unadjusted data resulted in an OR of 0.70 (0.55-0.89) but this disappeared upon analysis of studies with data adjusted for any covariate (0.93, 0.78-1.10). Whilst our pooled analysis suggest that weekly or more frequent alcohol consumption was negatively associated with OA, this was not observed when adjusted for confounding factors. Reasons for this include selection bias and lack of longitudinal exposure and adjustment for confounding variables.

Therefore, this meta-analysis provides evidence to dispel notions that alcohol use may be protective against OA.

23 February 2021 In General Health

OBJECTIVE: Several, but not all studies, have shown a dose-dependent inverse association with alcohol consumption and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), whereas smoking is an established risk factor for RA. We aimed to study the association between alcohol consumption and RA incidence and investigate a potential interaction between alcohol and smoking habits, regarding RA incidence.

METHODS: We used a prospective cohort study, based on 41 068 participants with detailed assessment of alcohol intake, smoking and potential confounders at baseline in 1997. We ascertained a total of 577 incident cases of RA during a mean of 17.7 years of follow-up through linkage to nationwide and essentially complete databases. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate HR with 95% CI. Interaction on the additive scale between alcohol and smoking was estimated by calculating the attributable proportion due to interaction (AP).

RESULTS: Overall, alcohol consumption was associated with a 30% reduced incidence of RA (HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.55 to 0.86) with a dose-response relationship (p value for trend <0.001) which remained significant after stratification by age and smoking habits. The positive association between smoking and RA incidence was reduced with increasing alcohol consumption (p value for trend <0.001). A synergistic effect was observed between alcohol and smoking (AP 0.40, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.64), indicating that 40% of the cases among the double exposed are due to the interaction per se.

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest an inverse association between alcohol consumption and RA incidence, and a synergistic effect between alcohol and smoking.

16 February 2021 In Cardiovascular System
AIMS : There is inconsistent evidence on the relation of alcohol intake with incident atrial fibrillation (AF), in particular at lower doses. We assessed the association between alcohol consumption, biomarkers, and incident AF across the spectrum of alcohol intake in European cohorts. METHODS AND RESULTS : In a community-based pooled cohort, we followed 107 845 individuals for the association between alcohol consumption, including types of alcohol and drinking patterns, and incident AF. We collected information on classical cardiovascular risk factors and incident heart failure (HF) and measured the biomarkers N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity troponin I. The median age of individuals was 47.8 years, 48.3% were men. The median alcohol consumption was 3 g/day. N = 5854 individuals developed AF (median follow-up time: 13.9 years). In a sex- and cohort-stratified Cox regression analysis alcohol consumption was non-linearly and positively associated with incident AF. The hazard ratio for one drink (12 g) per day was 1.16, 95% CI 1.11-1.22, P
23 November 2020 In General Health

OBJECTIVE: Previous studies investigating association of alcohol intake and fracture risk in elderly yielded conflicting results. We first examined the association between alcohol intake and total fracture risk in elderly subjects and further analyzed whether the association varied by fracture locations.

METHODS: This is a nationwide population-based cohort study which included all people aged 66 (n=1,431,539) receiving the National Screening Program during 2009-2014. Time-to-event were defined as duration from study recruitment, the day they received health screening, to the occurrence of fracture.

RESULTS: Total fracture was significantly lower in mild drinkers [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR)=0.952; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) =0.931-0.973] and higher in heavy drinkers (aHR=1.246; 95% CI=1.201-1.294) than non-drinkers. Risk pattern of alcohol consumption and fracture differed according to affected bones. Similar J-shaped trends were observed for vertebra fractures, but risk of limb fracture showed a linear relationship with alcohol intake. For hip fracture, risk decrement was more pronounced in mild and moderate drinkers, and significant increment was noted only in very severe drinkers [>/=60 g/day; (aHR)=1.446; 1.162-1.801].

CONCLUSION: Light to moderate drinking generally lowered risk of fractures, but association between alcohol and fracture risk varied depending on the affected bone lesions.

Page 1 of 273

Contact us

We love your feedback. Get in touch with us.

  • Tel: +32 (0)2 230 99 70
  • Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Disclaimer

The authors have taken reasonable care in ensuring the accuracy of the information herein at the time of publication and are not responsible for any errors or omissions. Read more on our disclaimer and Privacy Policy.