06 May 2014 In General Health

 

 

 

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible association of cigarette smoking, coffee drinking, and wine consumption with essential tremor using a matched case-control design. Cases and controls were enrolled from 6 Movement Disorder centers in central-southern Italy. Essential tremor was diagnosed according to Bain's criteria. Three unrelated healthy controls (not affected by neurological disorders) per each enrolled case, matched by sex and age (+/-5 years), were selected. A standardized questionnaire was administered to record demographic, epidemiological, and clinical data. All cases and controls underwent a standard neurological examination. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using conditional logistic regression for the matched cases and controls. Eighty-three patients with essential tremor (38 men and 45 women; mean age, 68.2 +/- 8.6 years) and 245 matched control subjects (113 men and 132 women; mean age, 68.4 +/- 9.7 years) were enrolled in the study. Multivariate analysis showed a significant negative association between essential tremor and wine consumption preceding the onset of disease (adjusted odds ratio, 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.64; P = .0005) with a significant dose effect (1-2 glass of wine per day: odds ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-0.95; P = .04; more than 3 glass of wine per day: odds ratio, 0.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.03-0.62; P = .01). In our sample no association between essential tremor and cigarette smoking or coffee drinking was found. Our data suggest a negative association between wine drinking and essential tremor, which could be explained by the long-term neuroprotective effect of its antioxidant components.

 

 

 

06 May 2014 In General Health

 

 

 

Abstract The relationship between exposure to lifestyle factors and adverse effects on human reproductive health is debated in the scientific literature and these controversies have increased public and regulatory attention. The aim of the study was to examine the association between modifiable lifestyle factors and main semen parameters, sperm morphology, and sperm chromatin structure. The study population consisted of 344 men who were attending an infertility clinic for diagnostic purposes with normal semen concentration of 20-300 M/ml or with slight oligozoospermia (semen total concentration of 15-20 M/ml) [WHO 1999]. Participants were interviewed and provided semen samples. The interview included questions about demographics, socio-economic status, medical history, lifestyle factors (consumption of alcohol, tobacco, coffee intake, cell phone and sauna usage), and physical activity. The results of the study suggest that lifestyle factors may affect semen quality. A negative association was found between increased body mass index (BMI) and semen volume (p = 0.03). Leisure time activity was positively associated with sperm concentration (p = 0.04) and coffee drinking with the percentage of motile sperm cells, and the percentage of sperm head and neck abnormalities (p = 0.01, p = 0.05, and p = 0.03, respectively). Drinking red wine 1-3 times per week was negatively related to sperm neck abnormalities (p = 0.01). Additionally, using a cell phone more than 10 years decreased the percentage of motile sperm cells (p = 0.02). Men who wore boxer shorts had a lower percentage of sperm neck abnormalities (p = 0.002) and percentage of sperm with DNA damage (p = 0.02). These findings may have important implications for semen quality and Lifestyle.

 

 

 

06 May 2014 In Diabetes

 

 

 

BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have reported inverse associations of coffee, tea, and alcohol intake with risk of type 2 diabetes, but none has reported results separately among African American women.

OBJECTIVE: We prospectively examined the relation of coffee, tea, and alcohol consumption to diabetes risk in African American women.

DESIGN: The study included 46,906 Black Women's Health Study participants aged 30-69 y at baseline in 1995. Dietary intake was assessed in 1995 and 2001 by using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. During 12 y of follow-up, there were 3671 incident cases of type 2 diabetes. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% CIs were estimated by using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for diabetes risk factors.

RESULTS: Multivariable RRs for intakes of 0-1, 1, 2-3, and >/=4 cups of caffeinated coffee/d relative to no coffee intake were 0.94 (95% CI: 0.86, 1.04), 0.90 (95% CI: 0.81, 1.01), 0.82 (95% CI: 0.72, 0.93), and 0.83 (95% CI: 0.69, 1.01), respectively (P for trend = 0.003). Multivariable RRs for intakes of 1-3, 4-6, 7-13, and >/=14 alcoholic drinks/wk relative to never consumption were 0.90 (95% CI: 0.82, 1.00), 0.68 (95% CI: 0.57, 0.81), 0.78 (95% CI: 0.63, 0.96), and 0.72 (95% CI: 0.53, 0.98), respectively (P for trend < 0.0001). Intakes of decaffeinated coffee and tea were not associated with risk of diabetes.

CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that African American women who drink moderate amounts of caffeinated coffee or alcohol have a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes.

 

 

 

06 May 2014 In Cardiovascular System

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the role of diet in the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE). We explored the prospective relation of dietary patterns, food groups, and nutrients to incident VTE in older women.

METHODS: In 1986, Iowa women aged 55 to 69 years completed a mailed survey, including a 127-item food frequency questionnaire. These data were linked to Medicare data from 1986 to 2004, and International Classification of Diseases discharge codes were used to identify hospitalized VTE cases. Cox regression analyses evaluated relations of 2 principal components-derived dietary patterns, 11 food groups, and 6 nutrients to VTE, adjusted for age, education, smoking status, physical activity, and energy intake.

RESULTS: Over 19 years of follow-up, 1,950 of the 37,393 women developed VTE. Women consuming alcohol daily were at 26% (95% CI 11%-38%) lower risk of VTE as compared to nonconsumers. All alcoholic beverages types were in the direction of lower risk; however, only beer and liquor were statistically significant. After basic adjustments, coffee was inversely related to VTE, and diet soda and fish positively related. However, these associations were confounded and became nonsignificant after adjustment for body mass index and diabetes. No associations were observed with consumption of 'Western' or 'Prudent' dietary patterns, fruit, vegetables, dairy, meat, refined grains, whole grains, regular soda, vitamins E, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, folate, omega-3 fatty acids, or saturated fat.

CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of older women, greater intake of alcohol was associated with a lower risk of incident VTE. No other independent associations were seen between diet and VTE.

Page 4 of 5

Disclaimer

The authors have taken reasonable care in ensuring the accuracy of the information herein at the time of publication and are not responsible for any errors or omissions. Read more on our disclaimer and Privacy Policy.