28 September 2023 In Osteoporosis

INTRODUCTION: Osteoporosis prevalence will increase in coming decades, with significant financial and economic implications. Whilst alcohol excess has significant detrimental impacts on bone mineral density (BMD), knowledge of low-volume consumption is inconsistent. Type of alcohol may mediate impact on BMD and warrants further investigation.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Participants were drawn from the Florey Adelaide Male Aging Study, a cohort of community dwelling men from Adelaide, Australia (n = 1195). The final cohort (n = 693) provided information regarding alcohol consumption and undertook BMD scan at wave one (2002-2005) and wave two (2007-2010). Cross-sectional and longitudinal multivariable regression was performed for whole-body and spine BMD. To assess change in exposure over time, change in BMD was compared to change in covariates between waves.

RESULTS: Cross-sectionally, whole-body BMD was positively associated with obesity (p < 0.001), exercise (p = 0.009), prior smoking (p = 0.001), oestrogen concentration (p = 0.001), rheumatoid arthritis (p = 0.013) and grip strength (p < 0.001).

No association was identified with volume of differing types of alcohol consumed. Spinal BMD was inversely associated with low-strength beer consumption (p = 0.003). The volume of alcohol consumed at Wave 1 did not predict change in whole-body or spinal BMD; however, increases in full-strength beer consumption between waves were associated with reduced spinal BMD (p = 0.031). CONCLUSION: When consumed at quantities in the usual social range, alcohol was not associated with whole-body BMD. However, low-strength beer consumption was inversely related to spinal BMD.

07 February 2023 In General Health

Although it is clearly established that the abuse of alcohol is seriously harmful to health, much epidemiological and clinical evidence seem to underline the protective role of moderate quantities of alcohol and in particular of wine on health. This narrative review aims to re-evaluate the relationship between the type and dose of alcoholic drink and reduced or increased risk of various diseases, in the light of the most current scientific evidence.

In particular, in vitro studies on the modulation of biochemical pathways and gene expression of wine bioactive components were evaluated. Twenty-four studies were selected after PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar searches for the evaluation of moderate alcohol/wine consumption and health effects: eight studies concerned cardiovascular diseases, three concerned type 2 diabetes, four concerned neurodegenerative diseases, five concerned cancer and four were related to longevity.

A brief discussion on viticultural and enological practices potentially affecting the content of bioactive components in wine is included. The analysis clearly indicates that wine differs from other alcoholic beverages and its moderate consumption not only does not increase the risk of chronic degenerative diseases but is also associated with health benefits particularly when included in a Mediterranean diet model. Obviously, every effort must be made to promote behavioral education to prevent abuse, especially among young people.

29 January 2023 In General Health

Although it is clearly established that the abuse of alcohol is seriously harmful to health, much epidemiological and clinical evidence seem to underline the protective role of moderate quantities of alcohol and in particular of wine on health.

This narrative review aims to re-evaluate the relationship between the type and dose of alcoholic drink and reduced or increased risk of various diseases, in the light of the most current scientific evidence.

In particular, in vitro studies on the modulation of biochemical pathways and gene expression of wine bioactive components were evaluated. Twenty-four studies were selected after PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar searches for the evaluation of moderate alcohol/wine consumption and health effects: eight studies concerned cardiovascular diseases, three concerned type 2 diabetes, four concerned neurodegenerative diseases, five concerned cancer and four were related to longevity.

A brief discussion on viticultural and enological practices potentially affecting the content of bioactive components in wine is included.

The analysis clearly indicates that wine differs from other alcoholic beverages and its moderate consumption not only does not increase the risk of chronic degenerative diseases but is also associated with health benefits particularly when included in a Mediterranean diet model. Obviously, every effort must be made to promote behavioral education to prevent abuse, especially among young people.

23 November 2022 In Cardiovascular System

OBJECTIVES: Many studies have found that moderate alcohol consumption is associated with lower risks of mortality and myocardial infarction (MI). Our aim was to examine the potential effects of alcohol on all-cause mortality and MI in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a risk factor condition.

METHODS: A cohort study (1995-2017) was conducted using medical records of RA patients from The Health Improvement Network in the United Kingdom (UK). Alcohol exposure was divided into non-drinkers, mild (1-7 UK units/week), moderate (8-14 UK units/week), moderate-high (15-21 UK units/week), and high (>21 UK units/week) consumption levels. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for the relation of alcohol consumption to all-cause mortality and MI, adjusting for covariates.

RESULTS: Of 30,320 RA patients, 5,994 deaths and 1,098 MI cases occurred over 236,188 person-years. Mild-to-moderate alcohol use was associated with lower all-cause mortality in RA patients, including those taking methotrexate. The multivariable HRs (95% CI) for mortality by alcohol use category were non-drinkers 1.0, mild 0.80 (0.75-0.85), moderate 0.74 (0.67-0.82), moderate-high 0.84 (0.72-0.98), and high 0.99 (0.86-1.15). Mild, moderate-high, and high levels of alcohol use were associated with lower risk of MI among RA patients. The HRs MI risk by alcohol use category were non-drinkers 1.0, mild 0.81 (0.70-0.94), moderate 0.84 (0.68-1.04), moderate-high 0.51 (0.35-0.74), and high 0.59 (0.42-0.84).

CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that mild-to-moderate alcohol use is associated with a lower mortality risk and overall alcohol use is associated with a lower MI risk in RA patients, similar to the general population.

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