26 January 2022 In Diabetes

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) is a risk predictor for myocardial infarction and stroke. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at higher risk for such conditions. The association of alcohol consumption with IMT is still controversial.

METHODS AND STUDY DESIGN: We undertook a cross-sectional study of patients hospitalized in the Department of Endocrinology at Zhoushan Hospital from January 1st, 2013 to December 31st, 2015. Patients with a past medical history of cerebrovascular events, acute myocardial ischemia or unable to provide a detailed alcohol consumption history were excluded. Carotid IMT, together with blood biochemical examinations were collected. Data were analyzed using least significant difference t test, Tamhane's T2 test, Levene test, chi2-test and binary logistic regression model.

RESULTS: 281 patients were enrolled in the study. The number of patients with elevated carotid IMT in moderate alcohol consumers was apparently less than alcohol non/heavy-consumers. In addition, the number of participants with elevated carotid IMT in liqueur consumers was higher than alcohol non-consumers and rice wine/beer consumers. Systolic blood pressure, C-reactive protein, glycosylated hemoglobin, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase, uric acid, cholesterol and creatinine levels were higher in elevated IMT patients, while high density lipoprotein cholesterol level was levels were significantly lower (p value<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: Moderate alcohol consumption has a protective effect on atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, requiring consideration to dietary intake and physical activity, among other influences. Inflammation theory and lipid metabolism could be involved in such prophylaxis effects.

22 October 2021 In General Health

Our objective was to investigate longitudinal associations between alcohol drinking and body mass index (BMI). Alcohol drinking (exposure), BMI (outcome), smoking habit, occupation, longstanding illness, and leisure time physical activity (potential confounders) were assessed at ages 30, 34, 42, and 46 in the 1970 British Birth Cohort Study. Multilevel models were used to cope with the problem of correlated observations. There were 15,708 observations in 5931 men and 14,077 observations in 5656 women. Drinking was associated with BMI in men. According to the regression coefficients, BMI was expected to increase by 0.36 (95% confidence interval: 0.11, 0.60) kg/m(2) per year in men who drank once a week and by 0.40 (0.14, 0.15) kg/m(2) per year in men who drank most days. In ten years, BMI was expected to increase by 5.4kg/m(2) in men who drank and by 2.9kg/m(2) in men who drank and were physically active. Drinking was not associated with BMI in women. Rather, BMI was expected to increase by 0.25 (0.07, 0.43) kg/m(2) per year in women who were former smokers. In ten years, BMI was expected to increase by 4.3kg/m(2) in women who were former smokers and by 0.8kg/m(2) in women who were former smokers and who were physically active. Associations between drinking and BMI were similar after further adjustment for problematic drinking and diet. These longitudinal data suggest that drinking is associated with BMI in men and that drinking is not associated with BMI in women independent of other lifestyle risk factors.

22 October 2021 In Cardiovascular System

Alcohol consumption has been shown to have complex, and sometimes paradoxical, associations with cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Several hundred epidemiological studies on this topic have been published in recent decades. In this narrative review, the epidemiological evidence will be examined for the associations between alcohol consumption, including average alcohol consumption, drinking patterns, and alcohol use disorders, and CVDs, including ischaemic heart disease, stroke, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. Methodological shortcomings, such as exposure classification and measurement, reference groups, and confounding variables (measured or unmeasured) are discussed. Based on systematic reviews and meta-analyses, the evidence seems to indicate non-linear relationships with many CVDs. Large-scale longitudinal epidemiological studies with multiple detailed exposure and outcome measurements, and the extensive assessment of genetic and confounding variables, are necessary to elucidate these associations further. Conflicting associations depending on the exposure measurement and CVD outcome are hard to reconcile, and make clinical and public health recommendations difficult. Furthermore, the impact of alcohol on other health outcomes needs to be taken into account. For people who drink alcohol, the less alcohol consumed the better.

21 July 2021 In General Health

BACKGROUND: College student drinking in on-premises establishments has been associated with heavy alcohol consumption and a range of problems including assault, fighting, risky sex, and drinking and driving. Although more strictly enforcing overservice laws might reduce heavy drinking in on-premises establishments, law enforcement agencies have few resource-efficient tools for doing so, resulting in these laws seldom being enforced.

OBJECTIVES: In this paper, we report the results of an evaluation of the Stop Service to Obviously-impaired Patrons (S-STOP) program that was implemented in 303 bars and restaurants in 18 university communities in California using a randomized cross-over design (early vs. delayed implementation). The S-STOP program: (a) deployed pseudo-intoxicated patrons who attempted to purchase a drink when showing obvious signs of intoxication; (b) provided feedback to owners and managers on staff performance; and (c) offered free online refresher training for staff.

RESULTS: Overall, alcohol servers in bars and restaurants in these college communities were willing to serve a pseudo-intoxicated mystery shopper 90% of the time. The study found no evidence that S-STOP reduced the prevalence of alcohol sales to apparently impaired patrons during the two intervention stages of the study.

CONCLUSIONS: The findings highlight the need for developing effective interventions to prevent overservice and should prompt college and university leaders to take the lead in addressing the problem of alcohol overservice at on-premises establishments by working with community leaders, law enforcement, and retailers.

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