15 June 2022 In Diabetes
AIMS: We examined associations of baseline alcohol drinking with incident type 2 diabetes (T2D) or impaired fasting glucose (IFG), and explore whether the associations were modified by genetic polymorphisms of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) and alcohol dehydrogenase-1B (ADH1B). MATERIALS AND METHODS: All participants were aged 50+ (mean = 60.45; standard deviation = 6.88) years. Information of alcohol consumption was collected at baseline from 2003 to 2008. Incident T2D was defined as fasting glucose >/=7.0 mmol/L or post-load glucose >/=11.1 mmol/L at follow-up examination (2008-2012), self-reported T2D and/or initiation of hypoglycaemia medication or insulin during follow-up. Impaired fasting glucose was defined as fasting glucose >/=5.6 mmol/L and
15 June 2022 In Diabetes

Despite earlier meta-analyses on the association between adherences to Mediterranean diet (MD) and risk of diabetes, there is no comprehensive and updated study assessing this issue. Furthermore, no earlier study has examined the nonlinear dose-response relationship between consumption of Mediterranean diet and risk of diabetes. The current systematic review and meta-analysis was done to investigate the linear and non-linear dose-response relationship between Mediterranean diet and incidence of diabetes. Using relevant keywords, electronic searches for prospective studies were conducted in ISI Web of Science, PubMed, and Scopus until January 2022. The reported hazard ratios or odds ratios in the primary studies were regarded as risk ratios (RRs). The overall effect was calculated using a random-effects model that accounts for between-study variability. The potential non-linear dose-response associations were tested using a two-stage hierarchical regression model. Based on 16 prospective studies (with 17 effect sizes), we found that the greatest adherence to the Mediterranean diet was significantly associated with a reduced risk of diabetes (Pooled RR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.77-0.90; I2 =79%, P</= 0.001). Based on linear dose-response analysis, each 1-score rise in the Mediterranean diet score was associated with a 3% decreased risk of diabetes (HR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.96-0.98, P< 0.001). A nonlinear relationship (P nonlinearity = 0.001) was also observed between Mediterranean diet score and risk of type 2 diabetes. Even modest adherence to the Mediterranean diet was linked to a decreased incidence of type 2 diabetes.

15 June 2022 In Dementia

BACKGROUND: Low-to-moderate alcohol consumption appears to have potential health benefits. Existing evidence concludes that wine may be associated with a lower incidence of certain diseases. This systematic review and meta-analysis aim to examine evidence on the association between wine consumption and cognitive decline and to analyze whether this association varies depending on the wine consumption level or is affected by individual and study characteristics, including mean age, percentage of women participants, and follow-up time.

METHODS: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we undertook a search in MEDLINE (via PubMed), Scopus, Cochrane, and Web of Science databases for longitudinal studies measuring the association between wine consumption and cognitive decline from their inception to May 2021. Effect sizes were calculated using the DerSimonian and Laird and Hartung-Knapp-Sidik-Jonkman methods.

RESULTS: The search retrieved 6,055 articles, 16 of which were included in this systematic review. In total, 12 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The studies were published between 1997 and 2019. They were conducted in nine different countries. The sample size of the included studies ranged from 360 to 10,308 with a mean age of 70 years old. Using the DerSimoniand and Laird method, the pooled RR for the effect of wine consumption on cognitive decline was 0.72 (95% CI 0.63-0.80; I (2) = 82.4%; tau(2): 0.0154). Using the Hartung-Knapp-Sidik-Jonkman method, the RR was 0.65 (95% CI 0.52-0.79; I (2) = 94,531%; tau(2): 0.057).

CONCLUSIONS: This study may show a protective effect of wine consumption against cognitive decline. However, it would be important for future research to differentiate the types of wine within consumption.

15 June 2022 In Cardiovascular System

Evidence from research studies reports that wine consumption is associated with lower cardiovascular disease risk, partly through the amelioration of oxidative stress. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of regular light to moderate wine consumption from coronary heart disease (CHD) patients compared to the effect induced by alcohol intake without the presence of wine microconstituents, on oxidation-induced macromolecular damage as well as on endogenous antioxidant enzyme activity. A randomized, single-blind, controlled, three-arm parallel intervention was carried out, in which 64 CHD patients were allocated to three intervention groups. Group A consumed no alcohol, and Group B (wine) and Group C (ethanol) consumed 27 g of alcohol/day for 8 weeks. Blood and urine samples were collected at baseline and at 4 and 8 weeks. Urine oxidized guanine species levels, protein carbonyls, thiobarbituric acid substances (TBARS) levels, as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, were measured. Oxidized guanine species and protein carbonyl levels were significantly increased in the ethanol group during the intervention and were significantly decreased in the wine group. These results support the idea that wine's bioactive compounds may exert antioxidant actions that counteract the macromolecular oxidative damage induced by alcohol in CHD patients.

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