Social and Cultural Aspects

In Europe and the world, the consumption patterns of alcoholic beverages as well as the expectations about the effects of alcohol are strongly influenced by cultural factors. The vast majority of people who drink wine, do so in moderation. This is the reason why reducing the overall amount of alcohol a society consumes does not necessarily reduce the drinking problems in this society. Thus, it is important to consider cultural and social factors when developing alcohol policies.

 

The above summary provides a short overview of the topic, for more details and specific questions, please refer to the articles in the database.

Aims: This study aims to investigate the influence of social context variables on Episodic Heavy Drinking (EHD) among young adults. It will assess (a) whether EHD is predicted by characteristics of the specific drinking situation and drinking motives, and (b) whether the influence of drinking motives is moderated by public versus private drinking. Design/Setting: Data were collected by means of an online survey conducted at the University of Münster (Germany) in December 2008. Participants: The analytical sample consisted of 1,638 students. Instruments: Information was collected on socio-demographics, habitual drinking behavior (beverage-specific quantity and frequency within the past 30 days, EHD, drunkenness), and drinking motives (Drinking Motive Questionnaire Revised, DMQ-R). Moreover, participants described a recent drinking situation (beverage-specific quantity, drunkenness) as…
AIM - This paper assesses alcohol policies and interventions in Finland and the Canadian province of Ontario, using the policy options and interventions recommended in WHO's Global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol (2010). DATA & METHODS - The information and data are based on archival sources, surveys, legislative and government documents, and published papers. The paper assesses both jurisdictions on 10 areas in the WHO document and their sub-topics: 1. leadership, 2. health services response, 3. community action, 4. drinking and driving policies and countermeasures, 5. availability of alcohol, 6. marketing of alcoholic beverages, 7. pricing policies, 8. reducing the negative consequences of drinking and alcohol intoxication, 9. reducing the public health impact of illicit alcohol and…
Aims: In many studies, the extent of over-serving has been registered, but few attempts have been made to understand what happens in these situations when alcohol is ordered. The present study was designed to address two questions: How can we understand and explain why bartenders over-serve customers who are clearly intoxicated? What influences the interactions between bartenders and customers in situations in which alcohol is served? Design: Observation of 32 purchase attempts with pseudo-patrons, and in-depth interviews with seven bartenders. The bartenders interviewed were not those who were involved in the test purchasing. Findings: In the majority of cases, the pseudo-patrons were served without the bartender showing any sign of evaluating the customer's level of intoxication. Three factors affect the…
BACKGROUND: Excessive alcohol consumption is responsible for an average of 80,000 deaths in the U.S. each year and cost $223.5 billion ($1.90/drink) in 2006. Comparable state estimates of this cost are needed to help inform prevention strategies. PURPOSE: The goal of the study was to estimate the economic cost of excessive drinking by state for 2006. METHODS: From December 2011 to November 2012, an expert panel developed methods to allocate component costs from the 2006 national estimate to states for (1) total; (2) government; (3) binge drinking; and (4) underage drinking costs. Differences in average state wages were used to adjust productivity losses. RESULTS: In 2006, the median state cost of excessive drinking was $2.9 billion (range: $31.9 billion [California]…
AIMS: To test whether (i) drinking motives predict the frequency of pre-drinking (i.e. alcohol consumption before going out); (ii) drinking motives predict HDGE (heavy drinking on a given evening: 4+ for women, 5+ for men) and related adverse consequences (hangover, injuries, blackouts, etc.), even when pre-drinking is accounted for, and (iii) drinking motives moderate the impact of pre-drinking on HDGE and consequences. DESIGN: Using the internet-based cellphone-optimized assessment technique (ICAT), participants completed a series of cellphone questionnaires every Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening over 5 weeks. SETTING: French-speaking Switzerland. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 183 young adults [53% female, mean age (standard deviation) = 23.1 (3.1)] who completed 7828 questionnaires on 1441 evenings. MEASUREMENTS: Drinking motives assessed at baseline, alcohol consumption…
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