13 October 2020 In Phenolic compounds
BACKGROUND: Effects of resveratrol on metabolic health have been studied in several short-term human clinical trials, with conflicting results. Next to dose, the duration of the clinical trials may explain the lack of effect in some studies, but long-term studies are still limited. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of 6-mo resveratrol supplementation on metabolic health outcome parameters. METHODS: Forty-one overweight men and women (BMI: 27-35 kg/m2; aged 40-70 y) completed the study. In this parallel-group, double-blind clinical trial, participants were randomized to receive either 150 mg/d of resveratrol (n = 20) or placebo (n = 21) for 6 mo. The primary outcome of the study was insulin sensitivity, using the Matsuda index. Secondary outcome measures were intrahepatic lipid (IHL) content, body composition, resting energy metabolism, blood pressure, plasma markers, physical performance, quality of life, and quality of sleep. Postintervention differences between the resveratrol and placebo arms were evaluated by ANCOVA adjusting for corresponding preintervention variables. RESULTS: Preintervention, no differences were observed between the 2 treatment arms. Insulin sensitivity was not affected after 6 mo of resveratrol treatment (adjusted mean Matsuda index: 5.18 +/- 0.35 in the resveratrol arm compared with 5.50 +/- 0.34 in the placebo arm), although there was a significant difference in postintervention glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) between the arms (P = 0.007). The adjusted means showed that postintervention HbA1c was lower on resveratrol (35.8 +/- 0.43 mmol/mol) compared with placebo (37.6 +/- 0.44 mmol/mol). No postintervention differences were found in IHL, body composition, blood pressure, energy metabolism, physical performance, or quality of life and sleep between treatment arms. CONCLUSIONS: After 6 mo of resveratrol supplementation, insulin sensitivity was unaffected in the resveratrol arm compared with the placebo arm. Nonetheless, HbA1c was lower in overweight men and women in the resveratrol arm. This trial was registered at Clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02565979.
25 August 2020 In Phenolic compounds

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Epidemiological data suggest that moderate red wine consumption reduces cardiovascular mortality and the incidence of diabetes. However, whether these effects are due to ethanol or to non-alcoholic components of red wine still remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of moderate consumption of red wine, dealcoholized red wine, and gin on glucose metabolism and the lipid profile.

METHODS: Sixty-seven men at high cardiovascular risk were randomized in a crossover trial. After a run-in period, all received each of red wine (30 g alcohol/d), the equivalent amount of dealcoholized red wine, and gin (30 g alcohol/d) for 4 week periods, in a randomized order. Fasting plasma glucose and insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), plasma lipoproteins, apolipoproteins and adipokines were determined at baseline and after each intervention.

RESULTS: Fasting glucose remained constant throughout the study, while mean adjusted plasma insulin and HOMA-IR decreased after red wine and dealcoholized red wine. HDL cholesterol, Apolipoprotein A-I and A-II increased after red wine and gin. Lipoprotein(a) decreased after the red wine intervention.

CONCLUSIONS: These results support a beneficial effect of the non-alcoholic fraction of red wine (mainly polyphenols) on insulin resistance, conferring greater protective effects on cardiovascular disease to red wine than other alcoholic beverages. www.isrctn.org: ISRCTN88720134.

05 June 2020 In Diabetes

We aimed to elucidate the effect of chronic alcohol consumption on fatty liver. We assessed the consumption of alcohol in 2429 Japanese males (mean age: 54.2 +/- 9 years); they were classified according to average consumption into non-drinkers (ND), light drinkers (LD), moderate drinkers (MD), and heavy drinkers (HD).

The prevalence of fatty liver was the lowest in the MD and highest in the ND group (p < 0.001), while obesity was not significantly different among the groups (p = 0.133). Elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were the lowest in the MD group (p = 0.011) along with resistance to insulin (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)), which was highest in the ND group (p = 0.001).

Chronic consumption of alcohol was independently and inversely associated with fatty liver and insulin resistance after adjusting for obesity, hypertension, fasting hyperglycemia, habit of drinking sweet beverages, physical activity, and age (odds ratios are as follows: ND, 1; LD, 0.682; MD, 0.771; HD, 0.840 and ND, 1; LD, 0.724; MD, 0.701; HD, 0.800, respectively).

We found that regardless of the type of alcoholic beverage, chronic consumption of alcohol is inversely associated with insulin resistance and fatty liver in Japanese males. This study had limitations, most notably the lack of investigation into diet and nutrition.

04 May 2020 In Diabetes

We aimed to determine the association between alcohol consumption change on fasting serum glucose, insulin resistance, and beta cell function.

The study population consisted of 55,858 men from the Kangbuk Samsung Health Study. Participants were divided into non-, light, moderate, and heavy drinkers for each of the first and second health examinations based on a self-reported questionnaire on alcohol consumption. The adjusted mean values for change in fasting serum glucose (FSG), homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and beta cell function (HOMA-beta) levels were determined according to alcohol consumption change by linear regression. Compared to sustained initial drinkers, those who increased alcohol intake to moderate (p < 0.001) and heavy (p < 0.001) levels had increased FSG levels.

In contrast, reduction in alcohol intake to light levels among initial heavy drinkers was associated with reduced change in FSG levels (p = 0.007) compared to sustained heavy drinkers. No significant associations were observed between changes in alcohol intake with HOMA-IR levels. Compared to sustained light drinkers, those who increased alcohol intake to moderate (p < 0.001) and heavy (p = 0.009) levels had lower increases in HOMA-beta levels.

Finally, compared to sustained heavy drinkers, those who reduced alcohol consumption to light levels had greater increases in HOMA-beta levels (p = 0.002). Increases in alcohol consumption were associated with higher blood glucose levels and worsened beta cell function. Heavy drinkers who reduce alcohol intake could benefit from improved blood glucose control via improved beta cell function.

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