Studies have suggested that moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of CVD and premature mortality in individuals with diabetes mellitus. However, history of alcohol consumption has hardly been taken into account. We investigated the association between current alcohol consumption and mortality in men and women with diabetes mellitus accounting for past alcohol consumption. Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a cohort was defined of 4797 participants with a confirmed diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Men and women were assigned to categories of baseline and past alcohol consumption. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % CI for total mortality were estimated with multivariable Cox regression models, using light alcohol consumption (>0-6 g/d) as the reference category. Compared with light alcohol consumption, no relationship was observed between consumption of 6 g/d or more and total mortality. HR for >6-12 g/d was 0.89 (95 % CI 0.61, 1.30) in men and 0.86 (95 % CI 0.46, 1.60) in women. Adjustment for past alcohol consumption did not change the estimates substantially. In individuals who at baseline reported abstaining from alcohol, mortality rates were increased relative to light consumers: HR was 1.52 (95 % CI 0.99, 2.35) in men and 1.81 (95 % CI 1.04, 3.17) in women. The present study in diabetic individuals showed no association between current alcohol consumption >6 g/d and mortality risk compared with light consumption. The increased mortality risk among non-consumers appeared to be affected by their past alcohol consumption rather than their current abstinence.

Published in Diabetes

 

 

 

Acrylamide exposure was investigated in subgroups of the EPIC study population (510 subjects from 9 European countries, randomly selected and stratified by age, gender, and smoking status) using hemoglobin adducts of acrylamide (HbAA) and its primary metabolite glycidamide (HbGA). Blood samples were analyzed for HbAA and HbGA by HPLC/MS/MS. Statistical models for HbAA and HbGA were developed including body mass index (BMI), educational level, and physical activity. A large variability in acrylamide exposure and metabolism between individuals and country groups was observed with HbAA and HbGA values ranging between 15-623 and 8-377 pmol/g of Hb, respectively. Both adducts differed significantly by country, sex, and smoking status. HbGA values were significantly lower in high alcohol consumers than in moderate consumers. With increasing BMI, HbGA in nonsmokers and HbAA in smokers decreased significantly. In the assessment of potential health effects related to acrylamide exposure, country of origin, BMI, alcohol consumption, sex, and smoking status should be considered.

 

 

 

Published in Cancer

 

 

 

OBJECTIVE: In order to provide an updated quantification of the association between alcohol drinking and epithelial ovarian cancer risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of published observational studies.

METHODS: Using PubMed, we performed a literature search of all case-control and cohort studies published as original articles in English up to September 2011. We included 27 observational studies, of which 23 were case-control studies, 3 cohort studies and one pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies, including a total of 16,554 epithelial ovarian cancer cases. We derived pooled meta-analytic estimates using random-effects models.

RESULTS: The pooled relative risk (RR) for any alcohol drinking compared with non/occasional drinking was 1.00 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.95-1.05]. The RRs were 0.97 (95% CI, 0.92-1.02), 1.03 (95% CI, 0.96-1.11) and 1.09 (95% CI, 0.80-1.50) for light (1 to /= 3 drinks/day), respectively. In particular, the pooled RR for invasive epithelial ovarian cancers was 1.00 (95% CI, 0.95-1.06), while for borderline cancers was 0.96 (95% CI, 0.74-1.26). Stratified analyses across cancer histotypes revealed a modest protective effect of alcohol on endometrioid epithelial ovarian tumors (RR=0.82, 95% CI, 0.70-0.96), while no association was found for serous (RR=1.00, 95% CI, 0.84-1.19), mucinous (RR=0.91, 95% CI, 0.78-1.08) and clear cell (RR=0.93, 95% CI, 0.76-1.14) cancers. There was no evidence of publication bias.

CONCLUSIONS: This comprehensive meta-analysis provided no evidence of a material association between alcohol drinking and epithelial ovarian cancer risk.

 

 

 

Published in Cancer

 

 

 

The first behavioral aspect of mankind that has been commonly acknowledged as one of the main reasons for neoplasms is lifestyle. The specified lifestyle determines the exposure to the variety of carcinogens, whose crucial role in carcinogenesis is doubtless. The purpose of this study was to analyze women's lifestyle and its influence on the risk of developing breast cancer and benign tumors. The participants of the study were healthy women with no changes in mammary glands and women with diagnosed breast cancer or benign tumor. The total number of participants was 555 females aged 35-70 years. Every patient voluntarily filled in an anonymous questionnaire consisting of questions about socioeconomic conditions, number of cigarettes/daily, alcohol consumption, and physical activity. Proper education concerning a healthy lifestyle can positively contribute to a reduction in breast cancer. A high value of BMI, especially in the postmenopausal period, is a negative predictive factor increasing the risk of breast cancer. Physical activity decreases the risk of breast cancer. No such relation concerning smoking cigarettes has been proven.

 

 

 

Published in Cancer
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