To what extent could alcohol consumption affects female fertility is still unclear. The aim of this study was to quantitatively summarize the dose-response relation between total and specific types of alcohol beverage (beer, wine, and spirits) consumption in female and the fecundability. Four electronic databases were searched. Observational studies (cohort and case-control) that provided female alcohol consumption and fecundity were eligible. Nineteen studies, involving 98657 women, were included in this study. Compared to non-drinkers, the combined estimate (with relative risk, RR) of alcohol consumers on fecundability was 0.87 (95% CI 0.78-0.95) for overall 19 studies. Compared to non-drinkers, the pooled estimates were 0.89 (95% CI 0.82-0.97) for light drinkers (12.5 g/day of ethanol). Moreover, compared to non-drinkers, the corresponding estimates on fecundability were 0.98 (95% CI 0.85-1.11), 1.02 (95% CI 0.99-1.05), and 0.92 (95% CI 0.83-1.01) for studies focused on wine, beer and spirits, respectively. Dose-response meta-analysis suggested a linear association between decreased fecundability and every 12.5 g/d increasing in alcohol consumption with a RR 0.98 (95% CI 0.97-0.99). This first systematic review and meta-analysis suggested that female alcohol consumption was associated with a reduced fecundability.

Published in Liver Disease

There have been conflicting reports on the association of alcohol use and diverticular disease. We aimed to determine the odds of developing diverticular disease and diverticular bleeding in patients who consumed alcohol on a regular basis compared with those who did not. MEDLINE and PUBMED were searched up until February 2017 on observational trials, which investigated the effect of alcohol use on two outcomes of diverticular disease: diverticulosis and diverticular bleeding. Quantitative estimates (odds ratios [OR] and confidence intervals [CI]) from included studies were pooled by using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity across studies was assessed by the I2 statistic. In 6 studies including 53,644 subjects and 6 studies including 3,404 subjects, alcohol consumption on a regular basis was not associated with either diverticulosis (OR=1.99; 95% CI 0.99-4.03, I2=99%) or diverticular bleeding (OR=1.39; 95% CI 0.84-2.32, I2=45%) compared to subjects who did not consume alcohol on a regular basis, respectively. Increased odds of diverticulosis or diverticular bleeding among individuals who consume alcohol on a regular basis were not observed in these meta-analyses.

Published in General Health

BACKGROUND: Alcohol is a possible risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), but evidence from individual studies is weak and inconsistent. Existing narrative reviews suggest the possibility of non-linear associations. The aim here was to quantify any association using a systematic literature review, followed by dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies.

METHODS: MEDLINE, Embase and Web of Science were searched systematically to January 2017 for relevant prospective studies of alcohol consumption and AAA risk. Summary estimates of highest versus lowest levels of consumption, and linear and non-linear dose-response curves were quantified using random-effects models.

RESULTS: Eleven relevant cohorts were identified describing results from 3580 individuals with among 473 092 participants. Data were extracted from ten cohorts for meta-analyses of high versus low levels of alcohol consumption (risk ratio for AAA 0.93, 95 per cent c.i. 0.78 to 1.11; P = 0.4, I2 = 47 per cent). The linear dose-response risk ratio for AAA, derived from 11 cohorts, was 1.00 (0.97 to 1.04) per 8 g alcohol per day (P = 0.9, I2 = 73 per cent). Non-linear dose-response results showed a tick-shaped curve with lower risk up to 2 units/day, but increasing risk beyond that (P = 0.05). The increase in risk beyond 2 units/day was stronger in men than in women.

CONCLUSION: Although the linear dose-response analysis revealed little evidence of an association between alcohol consumption and AAA risk, a tick-shaped trend in the association was observed. This non-linear dose-response analysis revealed reduced risks for alcohol consumption below 2 units/day, masking increased risks for 2 or more units/day.

Published in Cardiovascular System

BACKGROUND: Whilst high levels of alcohol consumption are known to be associated with atrial fibrillation (AF), it is unclear if any level of alcohol consumption can be recommended to prevent the onset of the condition. The aim of this review is to characterise the association between chronic alcohol intake and incident AF.

METHODS AND RESULTS: Electronic literature searches were undertaken using PubMed and Embase databases up to 1 February 2016 to identify studies examining the impact of alcohol on the risk of incident AF. Prospective studies reporting on at least three levels of alcohol intake and published in English were eligible for inclusion. Studies of a retrospective or case control design were excluded. The primary study outcome was development of incident AF. Consistent with previous studies, high levels of alcohol intake were associated with an increased incident AF risk (HR 1.34, 95% CI 1.20-1.49, p<0.001). Moderate levels of alcohol intake were associated with a heightened AF risk in males (HR 1.26, 95% CI 1.04-1.54, p=0.02) but not females (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.86-1.25, p=0.74). Low alcohol intake, of up to 1 standard drink (SD) per day, was not associated with AF development (HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.85-1.06, p=0.37).

CONCLUSIONS: Low levels of alcohol intake are not associated with the development of AF. Gender differences exist in the association between moderate alcohol intake and AF with males demonstrating greater increases in risk, whilst high alcohol intake is associated with a heightened AF risk across both genders.

Published in Cardiovascular System
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