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Monday, 30 March 2020 14:14

Wine consumption and Alzheimer Disease

This review aimed to critically summarize the main relevant studies to clarify the relationship between wine drinking and Alzheimer Disease (AD), as well as how frequency and/or the amount of drinking may influence the effects of AD. AD is a common disease among aging individuals, being the sixth leading cause of all death and one of the most common causes of impairment. One possible method of delaying and/or preventing the onset of AD is changing its modifiable risk factors, among…
Over the past few decades, many studies reported that moderate drinkers of alcoholic beverages had a lower morbidity and mortality risk compared to non-drinkers (J-curve). Recent studies have raised concerns that even low to moderate consumption of alcoholic beverages may not offer any protection and it would be best to avoid drinking all together. The authors of the current study wanted to shed some light about this uncertainty and examined the association of different alcoholic beverage types with various health…
In this large prospective study, the researchers found moderate drinkers can increase their chances of longer life expectancy. The results of the Netherlands Cohort Study show that elderly men and women who moderately consume alcoholic beverages (5≤15 g of alcohol/day) have the highest chances of reaching 90 years of age compared with those who rarely or never consumed alcoholic beverages. More specifically, female moderate wine drinkers seem to live longer, however, the chances of reaching 90 years of age decreased…
A new study added another piece to the puzzle of the positive health effects of the Mediterranean diet: the results of this intervention showed that eating a Mediterranean diet for one year altered the microbiome of elderly individuals in ways which improved brain function and contributed to a longer life expectancy. Ageing is associated with the deterioration of various body functions and inflammation, resulting in the start of frailty. Such onset of frailty is associated with changes in the gut…
This UK study attempts to explain the inequalities in alcohol-related harm among lower socio-economic individuals. Alcohol-related harm was found to be higher in disadvantaged groups, despite similar alcohol consumption as advantaged groups. This is known as the alcohol harm paradox. This study investigated whether and to what extent individual alcohol consumption by type of beverage, smoking, BMI and other factors could account for alcohol-related hospital admissions. In addition, it was examined how the patterns of consumption by beverage type differed…
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