Liver Disease

Liver disease is any condition that causes liver inflammation or tissue damage and affects liver function. The liver is the largest organ in the body and performs a number of vital functions such as converting nutrients derived from food into essential blood components, storing vitamins and minerals, regulating blood clotting, producing  proteins, enzymes, maintaining hormone balances, and metabolizing and detoxifying substances that would otherwise be harmful to the body. The liver also produces bile, a liquid that helps with digestion.


A moderate amount of alcohol is broken down by the liver without any damage. However, when drinking excessively, the liver can transform alcohol into fat and accumulate these lipids and become injured or seriously damaged. Liver injury can be determined by histology, abdominal ultrasonography and by testing the blood concentration of certain enzymes, such as gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), aspartate amino-transferase (AST), and alanine amino-transferase (ALT).

On the other hand, some studies suggest that moderate and regular consumption of alcoholic beverages may play a protective role against fatty liver disease, the exact mechanisms involved have not yet been clearly established.

The above summary provides an overview of the topic, for more details and specific questions, please refer to the articles in the database.

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Studies assessing alcohol as a population-level risk factor for cirrhosis, typically focus on per capita consumption. However, clinical studies indicate that daily intake is a strong predictor of alcoholic cirrhosis. We aimed to identify the determinants of alcohol's contribution to the global cirrhosis burden and to evaluate the influence of daily drinking on a population level. METHODS: We performed a comprehensive analysis of the WHO 2014 Global Status Report on Alcohol and Health. We categorized countries by heavy or moderate drinking based on daily consumption, using U.S. Department of Agriculture definitions of heavy drinking. Additional data on cirrhosis cofactors were also obtained. Uni- and multivariate models were fitted to identify independent predictors of the alcohol-attributable fraction of…
BACKGROUND: Fatty liver (hepatic steatosis) is one of the most common diseases globally, with increasing prevalence. The role of alcohol consumption in the development of hepatic steatosis has not been systematically examined. METHODS: We searched Medline, Embase, and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global for original data on the relationship between alcohol consumption and hepatic steatosis measured by non-invasive imagery, excluding studies conducted in participants
Alcohol consumption is often a comorbid condition in other chronic liver diseases. It has been shown to act in synergy to increase liver injury in viral hepatitis, hereditary hemochromatosis, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), leading to an increased risk of cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver-related mortality. Data suggest that modest alcohol consumption may be inversely related to the risk of developing NAFLD and lower rates of progression of NAFLD to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). This article reviews data on the relationship between alcohol consumption and other chronic liver diseases.
BACKGROUND: The alcohol-attributable fraction (AAF) quantifies alcohol's disease burden. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is influenced by alcohol consumption per capita, duration, gender, ethnicity, and other comorbidities. In this study, we investigated the association between AAF/alcohol-related liver mortality and alcohol consumption per capita, while stratifying to per-capita gross domestic product (GDP). METHODS: Data obtained from the World Health Organization and World Bank for both genders on AAF on liver disease, per-capita alcohol consumption (L/y), and per-capita GDP (USD/y) were used to conduct a cross-sectional study. Countries were classified as "high-income" and "very low income" if their respective per-capita GDP was greater than $30,000 or less than $1,000. Differences in total alcohol consumption per capita and AAF were calculated using a 2-sample…
BACKGROUND & AIMS: The effect of ethanol consumption on hepatocarcinogenesis in patients with fatty liver disease (FLD) is not clear. We aimed to investigate the influence of alcohol consumption on hepatocarcinogenesis and determine the risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a large number of Japanese patients with FLD without viral hepatitis. METHODS: This multicenter, retrospective cohort study was conducted at a specialized center for hepatology in Japan and included 9959 patients with FLD without viral hepatitis, diagnosed by ultrasonography from January 1997 through December 2011. The patients' level of ethanol consumption was divided into 4 categories: /=70 g/day (n = 946). The primary endpoint was the onset of HCC. Statistical analyses performed included the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional…

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The authors have taken reasonable care in ensuring the accuracy of the information herein at the time of publication and are not responsible for any errors or omissions. Read more on our disclaimer.